People Outraged Over Female Weight Issues/Body Standards

Never let anyone claim society does not care about an issue unless it involves slavery or laws or lynching (fallacy of relative privation). "Heightism doesn't matter because racism, sexism, and homophobia are worse".

Okay, then what about all this?

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-40838979

http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/entry/robbie-sarah-tripp-curvy-wife-instagram-viral_us_5982b3e8e4b0fa1575fbf2e6

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/business/news/leading-employment-judges-call-for-law-banning-fattism-in-workplace-a6999401.html

Have fat women been treated like black people? Make no mistake, body shaming in general is hurtful, but it's interesting how much more politically incorrect it is to talk about weight compared to height. Matt Lewis pointed this out on CNN here:


If someone says "society only cares about an issue if it offends women," then I'll be the first to agree. Anything else is just an excuse. Give me one other reason why women's weight standards are a big deal but height prejudice is not. Take a look at short men's suicide rates, not to mention how height isn't controllable like weight. Imagine if judging someone by their politics (controllable) was considered worse than judging based on race (immutable). Picture how much worse weight disorders would be if we couldn't naturally change our BMI, and if people were labeled with an equivalent of "short man syndrome" the moment they became upset due to body shaming. Short men are stereotyped as being angry, yet one can find way more coverage of women outraged over body shaming (not that it's wrong to be upset in either situation, it's just funny how anger is only unacceptable when coming from short men). While someone may develop an eating disorder due to fat shaming, short males realize there is nothing they can naturally do about their height, so they simply kill themselves: [1][2][3].

Speaking of which, did weight disorders exist before they were researched? This is a rhetorical question, of course the answer is yes. The only difference is whether the disorder is acknowledged in the first place. Go to some forum like reddit.com/r/short and one can easily see that many males suffer from body image issues. Where's the concern? While this society harps on about "toxic masculinity," it seems not much has changed, because men are still expected to invincible while women are not.

People outright insult short men all the time, and at best barely anyone cares. At worst, any short guy who has a problem with it is labeled as insecure. When it comes to body shaming, notice how the focus is not on whether women take it on the chin, but rather the spotlight is on the initial rudeness itself. In fact, merely asking about or pointing out a woman's weight is considered rude, let alone mocking it. There's a reason why the WWE announces the men's weights but not the women's. Social conditioning has taught people that saying virtually anything about the obese is bullying, while most things height related are always classified as a joke (I wonder if this feminist and the 300+ who liked her tweet would think the same line about fat or flat women is amusing). Spoilers: she wouldn't. It's also interesting how some feminists take out their frustration on men who already aren't respected. Ever notice how these feminists don't use tall handsome guys as their punching bags?

When you're told from a young age that simply asking a woman about her weight is a cardinal sin, of course every comment about weight would be viewed as bullying. There can be no malicious intent behind saying something weight related, but it's considered rude regardless. If I'm wrong, then tell me one comment about weight that you can publicly say to a woman's face and have it not be considered rude. On the other hand, you can outright insult a short man, and if he doesn't take it obediently, then the problem is on his end (he has a napoleon complex, he's insecure, etc.).

Update: Apparently, universities also have a 'fat studies' course about the discrimination fat women face.

Update 2: While society is treating fat shaming as a serious issue, here is the kind of presentation heightism gets. It's all a joke to them, even when talking about derogatory stereotypes or the height wage gap.

Update 3: I keep finding more weirdness about how society views height.

http://archive.is/E75pc
According to society's mentality, judging a person based on their choices/lifestyle is not okay, but judging someone by how they're born is okay. For the record, I think both are rude (they're obviously intended to be), but look at the likes/retweets. It's the social difference in how much more popular and acceptable it is to bash short men that's worth noting. Also inb4 "it's just a prank bro."

Whenever I see women mocked over their traits, be it weight, height, breast size or whatever, there's always a plethora of people rushing to defend them. For example, when 4'11 Ariana Grande was mocked about her size, it sparked backlash. Often we see even 5'7 - 5'8 male stars like Tom Cruise or Kit Harington being mocked about their height. Where's the same reaction?

This is why weight discrimination has a university course while heightism remains a humorous topic. It's not the trait being targeted that matters, it's which gender is being affected. Hypothetically, if women cared about height prejudice rather than fat shaming, would people be defending short women or fat men right now?

Update 4: Almost 50k likes for this woman appalled by Macy's fat shaming plates:

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/mom-jean-plates-macys-pulls-plates-with-mom-jeans-and-skinny-jeans-portions/

But when some short guys once complained about a sign suggesting short people get down on all fours and drink with the dogs, even other short people responded with "it's just a joke, make fun of yourself, etc."


It's the hypocrisy that’s the real issue here. Either it should be okay to mock all body types or it shouldn't. When was the last time you saw the politically correct tell women to self-deprecate about their weight? This is just one double standard out of many. Another popular excuse to hate on short men is, “This one short guy offended me, so it’s now fair game to diss all short men.” Okay, but unless that same logic is applied to women’s bodies, it’s hypocritical. Good luck finding many mainstream outlets or tolerant progressives giving the greenlight on that though. “If you want to bodyshame women, just find one female you dislike with that body type, then have fun.” This is one case where the politically incorrect have the edge. They’re annoying, but at least there’s some consistency when they discriminate against everyone.